Recent Fire Damage Posts

Safety Steps

12/16/2019 (Permalink)

Safety Steps

If you're in a room with the door closed when the fire breaks out, you need to take a few extra steps:

  • Check to see if there's heat or smoke coming in the cracks around the door. (You're checking to see if there's fire on the other side.)
  • If you see smoke coming under the door — don't open the door!
  • If you don't see smoke — touch the door. If the door is hot or very warm — don't open the door!
  • If you don't see smoke — and the door is not hot — then use your fingers to lightly touch the doorknob. If the doorknob is hot or very warmdon't open the door!

If the doorknob feels cool, and you can't see any smoke around the door, open the door very carefully and slowly. When you open the door, if you feel a burst of heat or smoke pours into the room, quickly shut the door and make sure it is really closed. If there's no smoke or heat when you open the door, go toward your escape route exit.

https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/fire-safety.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs. 

If you can't get out right away

12/16/2019 (Permalink)

What if You Can't Get Out Right Away?

If you can't get out fast, because fire or smoke is blocking an escape route, you'll want to yell for help. You can do this from an open window or call 911 if you have a phone with you.

Even if you're scared, never hide under the bed or in a closet. Then, firefighters will have a hard time finding you. Know that firefighters or other adults will be looking for you to help you out safely. The sooner they find you, the sooner you both can get out.

In the meanwhile, keep heat and smoke from getting through the door by blocking the cracks around the door with sheets, blankets, and/or clothing. If there is a window in the room that is not possible to escape from, open it wide and stand in front of it. If you can grab a piece of clothing or a towel, place it over your mouth to keep from breathing in the smoke. This works even better if you wet the cloth first.

https://kidshealth.org/en/kids/fire-safety.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Checklist

12/16/2019 (Permalink)

Checklist for next steps after a fire Contact your local disaster relief service, such as the American Red Cross. They will help you find food, clothing, medicine and a place to stay. If you have insurance, contact your insurance company.  Ask what you should do to keep your home safe until it is repaired.  Ask who you should talk to about cleaning up your home.  If you are not insured, try contacting community groups for aid and assistance.  Check with the fire department to make sure that your home is safe to enter. Be very careful when you go inside. Floors and walls may not be as safe as they look.  Contact your landlord or mortgage company to report the fire.  Try to find valuable documents and records.  If you leave your home, call the local police department to let them know the site will be vacant.  Begin saving receipts for any money that you spend related to the fire loss. The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and to prove any losses claimed on your income tax. Check with an accountant or the IRS about special benefits for people recovering from fire loss.

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/publications/fa_46.pdf

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Prevent Home Fires

11/21/2019 (Permalink)

Fireplaces and Woodstoves

  • Inspect and clean woodstove pipes and chimneys annually and check monthly for damage or obstructions.
  • Use a fireplace screen heavy enough to stop rolling logs and big enough to cover the entire opening of the fireplace to catch flying sparks.
  • Make sure the fire is completely out before leaving the house or going to bed.

Children

  • Take the mystery out of fire play by teaching children that fire is a tool, not a toy.
  • Store matches and lighters out of children's reach and sight, preferably in a locked cabinet.
  • Never leave children unattended near operating stoves or burning candles, even for a short time.

More Prevention Tips

  • Never use stove range or oven to heat your home.
  • Keep combustible and flammable liquids away from heat sources.
  • Portable generators should NEVER be used indoors and should only be refueled outdoors or in well ventilated areas.

https://www.ready.gov/home-fires

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Learn about Fires

11/11/2019 (Permalink)

In just two minutes, a fire can become life-threatening. In five minutes, a residence can be engulfed in flames.

Learn About Fires

  • Fire is FAST!In less than 30 seconds a small flame can turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames.
  • Fire is HOT!Heat is more threatening than flames. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs and melt clothes to your skin.
  • Fire is DARK!Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness.
  • Fire is DEADLY!Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Asphyxiation is the leading cause of fire deaths, exceeding burns by a three-to-one ratio.

https://www.ready.gov/home-fires

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

During a Fire

11/11/2019 (Permalink)

During a Fire

  • Crawl low under any smoke to your exit - heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.
  • Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, or if there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.
  • If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.
  • If you can’t get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.
  • If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.
  • If you can’t get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.
  • If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department.

https://www.ready.gov/home-fires

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

After a Fire

11/11/2019 (Permalink)

The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.

  • Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.
  • If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.
  • Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.
  • The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.
  • Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.
  • Try to locate valuable documents and records.  Refer to information on contacts and the replacement process inside this brochure.
  • Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.
  • Notify your mortgage company of the fire.

https://www.ready.gov/home-fires

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Cleaning up and removing smoke odor

10/8/2019 (Permalink)

Cleaning up and removing smoke odor

  • Products containing tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) can reduce odors in fabrics. TSP is caustic so be careful! Read the label for directions and safety instructions.
  • Test garments before using any treatment, and follow the manufacturer's instructions. Smoke odor and soot can sometimes be washed from clothing that can be bleached. Measure 4 to 6 tbsp. Tri-Sodium Phosphate and 1 cup household cleaner or chlorine bleach for every gallon of warm water you will use. Alternatively, consider washing clothes in cold water with your usual household laundry detergent, and adding one tablespoon of pure vanilla extract.
  • To remove soot and smoke from walls, furniture and floors, use a mild soap or detergent or mix together 4 to 6 tbsp. tri-sodium phosphate and 1 cup household cleaner or chlorine bleach to every gallon of warm water. Wear rubber gloves. Be sure to rinse surfaces with clear warm water and dry thoroughly.

https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/fire/cleaning-up-after-fire.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs

What to expect after a fire

10/8/2019 (Permalink)

What to expect after a fire

What to expect A fire in your home can cause serious damage. Your home and many of the things in your home may be badly damaged by flames, heat, smoke and water. You will find things not damaged by the fire may still be ruined by smoke and may be soggy with water used to put out the fire. Anything you want to save or reuse will need to be carefully cleaned. To fight the fire, firefighters may have broken windows and cut holes in the roof. This slows the fire’s growth and gets rid of dark smoke that makes it hard for firefighters to see. They may have cut holes in your walls to make sure that the fire is completely out and not hidden in the walls. It is important to understand the risk to your safety and health even after the fire is out. The soot and dirty water left behind may contain things that could make you sick. Be very careful if you go into your home and if you touch any fire-damaged items.

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/publications/fa_46.pdf

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs

Fire Safety Tips

9/16/2019 (Permalink)

Check your Smoke Alarms

  1. Working smoke alarms reduce the chances of dying in a fire by nearly 50 percent. They are a critical first step for staying safe, but in order to be effective, they have to be working properly.
  2. For the best protection, install smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside every sleeping area and in each bedroom.
  3. Use Daylight Savings Time as a reminder to check your smoke alarms. Replace conventional batteries at least once a year, even if alarms are wired directly into your home’s electrical system.
  4. Consider installing a smoke alarm that has a 10-year battery.
  5. Smoke alarms expire after 10 years. So if your alarm is more than 10 years old, you should install a new one.

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24 hours a day 7 days a week 365 days a year ready to serve you!

https://www.safekids.org/tip/fire-safety-tips

Fire Safety Tips

9/16/2019 (Permalink)

Keep Flammable Materials in Safe Areas

  1. Remember to keep space heaters at least three feet away from anything that can burn, and always closely supervise children and pets when the heater is turned on.
  2. Make sure you turn space heaters off when you leave the room.
  3. If using gasoline-powered devices, store gasoline in a locked location where children cannot access it. Keep only small quantities in an approved container that has child safety features.

Don’t Over Plug

  1. To prevent possible fires, avoid plugging several appliance cords into the same electrical socket.

Stay Focused Around the Kitchen

  1. Use common sense in the kitchen. Limit distractions when cooking and don’t leave a hot oven or stovetop unattended.
  2. Keep anything that can catch fire, such as dish towels or wooden spoons, away from your stovetop.
  3. Have a fire extinguisher in the kitchen in case of emergency, and make sure you know how it works. You might be surprised that most people don’t know how to use one.

https://www.safekids.org/tip/fire-safety-tips

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Fire Drills- Be Prepared

9/16/2019 (Permalink)

Even young children (3 and older) can begin to learn what to do in case of a fire.  

  • Install at least 1 smoke alarm on every level of your home.
  • Have an escape plan and practice it with your family. This will help you and your family reach safety when it counts. When a fire occurs, there will be no time for planning an escape.  
  • Draw a floor plan of your home. Discuss with your family 2 ways to exit every room. Make sure everyone knows how to get out and that doors and windows can be easily opened to permit escape. If you live in an apartment building, never use an elevator during a fire. Use the stairs!
  • Agree on a meeting place. Choose a spot outside your home near a tree, street corner, or fence where everyone can meet after escaping. Teach your children that the sound of a smoke alarm means to go outside right away to the chosen place.  
  • Know how to call the fire department. The fire department should be called from outside using a portable phone or from a neighbor's home. Whether the number is 911 or a regular phone number, everyone in the family should know it by heart. Make sure your children know your home address, too. Teach your children that firefighters are friends and never to hide from them.  
  • Practice, practice, practice. Practice your exit drill at least twice a year. Remember that fire drills are not a race. Get out quickly, but calmly and carefully. Try practicing realistic situations. Pretend that some exits or doorways are blocked or that the lights are out. The more prepared your family is, the better your chances of surviving a fire.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/all-around/Pages/Fire-Safety.aspx

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365 for all of your restoration needs. 

Kitchen fires

8/1/2019 (Permalink)

Cooking brings family and friends together, provides an outlet for creativity and can be relaxing. But did you know that cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires and home injuries? By following a few safety tips, you can prevent these fires.

“Cook with Caution” • Be on alert! If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol don’t use the stove or stovetop. • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, boiling, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove. • If you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking. • Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — away from your stovetop. If you have a small (grease) cooking fire and decide to fight the fire... • On the stovetop, smother the flames by sliding a lid over the pan and turning off the burner. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled. • For an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed. If you have any doubt about fighting a small fire… • Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire. • Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number from outside the home.

https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/Public-Education/Resources/Safety-tip-sheets/CookingSafety.ashx?la=en

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Plan ahead

8/1/2019 (Permalink)

Plan Ahead! If a fire breaks out in your home, you may have only a few minutes to get out safely once the smoke alarm sounds. Everyone needs to know what to do and where to go if there is a fire.

Safety Tips:

  • Make a home escape plan. Draw a map of your home showing all doors and windows. Discuss the plan with everyone in your home.
  • Know at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily.
  • Have an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole or mailbox) a safe distance from the home where everyone should meet.
  • Practice your home fire drill at night and during the day with everyone in your home, twice a year.
  • Practice using different ways out.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own in case you can’t help them.
  • Close doors behind you as you leave.

IF THE ALARM SOUNDS:

  • If the smoke alarm sounds, get out and stay out. Never go back inside for people or pets.
  • If you have to escape through smoke, get low and go under the smoke to your way out.
  • Call the fire department from outside your home

https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/Public-Education/Resources/Safety-tip-sheets/EscapePlanningTips.ashx?la=en

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your mitigation needs.

How to prevent home fires

8/1/2019 (Permalink)

U.S. fire departments respond to a home fire every 86 seconds. That’s over 1,000 fires a day. Home fires can occur for a variety of reasons, but many are preventable. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of home fires, accounting for over half of home fires in 2015, followed by heating equipment, electrical malfunction, intentional fires and smoking materials.

Home fires are not 100 percent preventable. Though, you can take necessary steps today to reduce your risk of home fires. Here’s how:

  • Install and maintain smoke alarms on every floor of your home and within every bedroom. Roughly 50% of home fire deaths occur during the night while people are sleeping.
  • Never leave food cooking unattended, especially deep fryers and other frying equipment.
  • Avoid using portable and fixed space heaters, as heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fire deaths.
  • Have a fire plan that gets you out of your home in less than two minutes and practice it.
  • Avoid smoking in the house.

https://www.safety.com/fire-safety/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

How to use a fire extinguisher

8/1/2019 (Permalink)

Fire extinguishers are helpful for putting out small fires. You can contact your local fire department for fire extinguisher training. Or, follow these simple recommendations from the U.S. Fire Administration. To operate a fire extinguisher, remember the word “PASS:”

  • Pull the pin. Hold the fire extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away from you and remove the pin to unlock it.
  • Aim low. Point the nozzle at the base of the fire.
  • Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.
  • Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.

Fire extinguishers should be checked regularly and tested by a professional every few years.

It’s also useful to know that there are five different types of fire extinguishers for putting out different kinds of fires.

  • Class A extinguishers: for use on materials like cloth, wood, and paper.
  • Class B extinguishers: for use on combustible and flammable liquids like oil, gasoline, and grease.
  • Class C extinguishers: best for electrical equipment and appliances like stoves, televisions, and computers.
  • Class D extinguishers: for use with flammable metals.
  • Class K extinguishers: best for cooking oils commonly found in commercial kitchens, including vegetable oil.

Most dwellings have a multipurpose extinguisher that covers Classes A, B, and C. You can purchase these types of fire extinguishers at any home improvement store.

https://www.safety.com/fire-safety/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Prevent Home Fires

8/1/2019 (Permalink)

Home fires are preventable! The following are simple steps that each of us can take to prevent a tragedy.

Cooking:

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling, or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking.
  • Keep children away from cooking areas by enforcing a "kid-free zone" of 3 feet around the stove.
  • Position barbecue grills at least 10 feet away from siding and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches. 

Smoking

  • Smoke outside and completely stub out butts in an ashtray or a can filled with sand.
  • Soak cigarette butts and ashes in water before throwing them away. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.
  • Never smoke in a home where oxygen is used, even if it is turned off. Oxygen can be explosive and makes fire burn hotter and faster.
  • Be alert - don’t smoke in bed! If you are sleepy, have been drinking, or have taken medicine that makes you drowsy, put your cigarette out first.

https://www.ready.gov/home-fires

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Home fires

7/8/2019 (Permalink)

Before a fire

Smoke Alarms

A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.

  • Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors.
  • Test batteries monthly
  • Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non replaceable 10-year lithium batteries).
  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, both inside and outside of sleeping areas.
  • Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking-it can be a deadly mistake.

Smoke alarm safety for people with access or functional needs

  • Audible alarms for visually impaired people
  • Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired.
  • Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help., are also available.

https://www.ready.gov/home-fires

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

After a fire

7/8/2019 (Permalink)

The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.

  • Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.
  • If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies.  If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.
  • Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.
  • The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site.  DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.
  • Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items.  Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.
  • Try to locate valuable documents and records.  Refer to information on contacts and the replacement process inside this brochure.
  • Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss.  The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.
  • Notify your mortgage company of the fire.

https://www.ready.gov/home-fires

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

How to prevent a house fire

7/2/2019 (Permalink)

How to prevent a house fire

Fire prevention is more important than many realize and these general fire prevention practices help to keep your home safe:

  1. Clear your home’s surroundings of debris and combustible materials.
  2. Maintain your lawn and keep bushes and trees trimmed.
  3. Use fire-resistant materials when building or updating your home.
  4. Make sure your home has a fully functioning fire alarm system.
  5. Keep a shovel and fire extinguisher in an easily accessible place.
  6. Practice appropriate fire safety measures with campfires.
  7. Prepare a fire safety plan.

Many people think about the safety and security of their family, but they often overlook the dangers posed by fires. Fire safety can make all the difference in fire-prone areas and can help to prevent wildfires from spreading in dry, hot locations. Rather than letting a normal fire get out of hand, keep it contained by arming your home with the appropriate fire protections.

https://www.protectyourhome.com/blog/fire-detection-and-safety/how-to-prevent-a-house-fire

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Home Fire Preparedness

6/20/2019 (Permalink)

The 7 Ways to Prepare for a Home Fire

Install the right number of smoke alarms. Test them once a month and replace the batteries at least once a year. Purchase smoke alarms here.        

Teach children what smoke alarms sound like and what to do when they hear one. 

Ensure that all household members know two ways to escape from every room of your home and know the family meeting spot outside of your home.

Establish a family emergency communications plan and ensure that all household members know who to contact if they cannot find one another.

Practice escaping from your home at least twice a year. Press the smoke alarm test button or yell “Fire“ to alert everyone that they must get out.

Make sure everyone knows how to call 9-1-1.

Teach household members to STOP, DROP and ROLL if their clothes should catch on fire. 

https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/fire/home-fire-preparedness.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365 for all of your restoration needs!

Oven, Microwave, and Electrical Fires

2/21/2019 (Permalink)

Oven, Microwave, and Electrical Fires

Fires can happen anywhere in the kitchen — near an electrical outlet, in the microwave, or in the stove. Here are some tips to help you know what to do in case of any of these kitchen fires:

  • Oven fires. Immediately close the oven door and turn it off. If the fire doesn’t go out right away, call the fire department. Have the oven inspected and repaired before you use it again.
  • Microwave fires. Close the microwave door and keep it closed. Turn the microwave off and unplug it if you can do so safely. Leave it closed and don't use it again until you can have the appliance checked out by a technician.
  • Electrical fires. Prevent electrical fires by not overloading your electrical outlets with appliances. If a fire starts, use a fire extinguisher; never douse it with water. Always call the fire department for an electrical fire, even if you have already put it out with the fire extinguisher.

https://www.everydayhealth.com/healthy-home/general-safety/tips/how-and-when-to-fight-cooking-fires.aspx

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365, for all of you restoration needs

9 Facts about Fire

12/19/2018 (Permalink)

1. Understand the fire triangle 
A simplified cousin to the fire tetrahedron, the triangle represents the three components that fires need to exist: heat, oxygen and fuel. If one of these components is missing, a fire can’t ignite.

Heat can be generated by a cigarette, an electrical current or a home heater. Fuel can be anything combustible, such as wood, paper, clothing, furniture, gases or chemicals.

Once a fire starts, if any of the three components is removed, the fire is extinguished. Water is used to cool a fire and take away the heat source. Oxygen can be removed by smothering a fire with dirt, sand, a chemical agent or a blanket.

Fuel can be removed by moving combustible materials away from the fire or by simply waiting until the fire consumes the material and goes out of its own accord.

2. Fire kills
Every year more than 3,800 people die fire related deaths in the U.S. Approximately 18,300 people are injured every year in fires. Most of these fires could have been prevented by practicing proper fire safety and having fire alarms. On average more than 60 firefighters die every year in the line of duty.

3. It's in the kitchen
Most house fires start in the kitchen. Cooking is the leading cause of home fire injuries. Cooking fires often start from overheated grease and unattended cooking. Electric stoves are involved in more fires than gas stoves.

4. Leading causes of death
Another fact about fire is that smoking is the primary cause of death by fire in the U.S. The second cause of fire deaths is heating equipment.

5. Arson
Arson is the third most common cause of home fires. Arson in commercially operated buildings is the major reason for fire deaths and injuries in those types of properties.

6. Smoke inhalation
More people die from smoke inhalation than flames. Fire can suck all of the oxygen from a room and replace it with poisonous smoke and gases before flames even reach a room. Many times people die from lack of oxygen before the fire reaches their room.

7. Run report
According to NFPA, firefighters in the U.S. were called out on 501,500 structure fires in 2015. Between 2007 and 2011, there was an average of 2,570 civilian deaths and 13,210 civilian injuries per year, and a total estimated cost of $329 billion in 2011.

8. Candles
Candles caused approximately 9,300 home fires and 86 home fire deaths between 2009 and 2013.They were also responsible for 827 injuries and $374 million in property damage.

9. Smoke alarms 
Approximately two-thirds of all fire deaths happen in homes where there’s no working fire alarm. Your chance of dying in a home fire is cut in half if you have a working smoke alarm.

https://www.firerescue1.com/fire-products/Firefighter-Accountability/articles/1206336-9-facts-about-fire/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs

What to Dispose of after a fire

11/14/2018 (Permalink)

 Dispose of These Items After a Fire

There are some items that should always be tossed after a fire.

 
  • Perishable Food
    • If the electricity has been off for more than four hours, even after a small fire, most refrigerated and frozen food should be tossed. If a freezer is full and undamaged, check for ice crystals and you may be able to salvage the food for up to eight hours.
  • Non-Perishable Food
    • Any foods, even canned goods, that have been exposed to heat and firefighting chemicals should be tossed. The excessive heat can cause food to spoil even if the cans are not burned.
  • Cosmetics and Medicines
    • Water, smoke, firefighting chemicals, and excessively high temperatures can ruin cosmetics and medicines. It is not worth risking your health to salvage these items.
  • Electrical Equipment
    • No electrical items like small appliances or entertainment equipment should be used until they have been checked for water damage and heat damage to wiring. Toss any questionable items to avoid the possibility of another fire.
https://www.thespruce.com/cleanup-after-fire-4160200?utm_term=cleaning+up+after+a+fire&utm_content=p1-main-1-title&utm_medium=sem&utm_source=msn_s&utm_campaign=adid-473ea588-6bd2-429a-973d-d46bc26418e8-0-ab_msb_ocode-23793&ad=semD&an=msn_s&am=broad&q=cleaning+up+after+a+fire&o=23793&qsrc=999&l=sem&askid=473ea588-6bd2-429a-973d-d46bc26418e8-0-ab_msb SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs

Interior clean up

10/30/2018 (Permalink)

Interior Clean-Up

When you’re ready to move inside, do so with extreme caution. Open all doors carefully and never force them ajar; the doorway could be supporting the building’s (now precarious) structure, and shifting its position could lead to injury, further damage, or even a collapse. Find an alternate entry to the front door if necessary, and consult a building inspector or fire marshal before entering any interior rooms with a jammed door.

Once you’re inside, stop and sniff for a gas leak. If you even think you detect the odor, or if you hear a suspicious hissing sound that could be a broken gas line, leave the house immediately and call the fire department. Follow their instructions implicitly and be sure to let your neighbors know what’s going on so they can take the necessary precautions.

As you begin your interior inspection, don’t forget to look up; the ceiling may be unstable or show signs of sagging from water collection. Similarly, the walls and flooring may have been weakened from fire or water damage, so step lightly and test any areas that look questionable before putting your own weight on them. You can use thick plywood panels or wood boards to cover unstable areas, just be sure they extend at least 8-12 inches on each side of the damaged area.

Use fans and open windows to increase the circulation of air throughout the home. If there’s a great amount of water damage and you live in a warm, humid climate, it may be better to keep the windows shut and instead opt for a dehumidifier. In cold weather, the heating system can help remove humidity from the air — just don’t forget to check and clean the filter each day.

Dry any wet items like drapes, carpet, and furniture as soon as possible to avoid permanent mold and mildew damage. Aluminum foil or plastic wrap can be placed under furniture legs for protection, and any fully-dried items can be enclosed in plastic until all cleanup is completed. You’ll need to completely remove large area rugs for proper drying, especially those that extend wall-to-wall.

Before you can start working on ridding your house and belongings of smoke odor, you’ll first need to address any soot. Soot is quite oily, meaning it’s easily transferred among items and prone to staining. You may be able to remove it yourself by taking the vacuum hose and holding it slightly off the surface of the item or area. Never use an upright vacuum or brush tools when removing soot, as that can cause the soot to grind deeper into fabric and carpet. You may even want to hire a professional carpet cleaner to remove the soot with a professional grade heavy-duty shop vacuum designed for these purposes.

To remove soot from walls, use a chemical sponge or another non-water based cleaner. (Be especially careful with plaster walls — water-based cleaners can actually cause the soot to bleed into the wall.) You may have success using paint thinner or rubbing alcohol, though you’ll want to ensure the room you’re working in has adequate ventilation before you begin.

Removing smoke odor from fabrics can be a tricky process, but the good news is that you have several options for treatment. For clothing, it may help to add 1-2 cups of vinegar to each wash load, though it may take several cycles to completely remove it. For persistent smells, try dissolving one cup of dishwasher detergent with one gallon of warm water and soaking the items overnight. Wash them as usual the next day. Never attempt to counter the smell with fabric refreshers or perfumes — at best, it will only mask the smell temporarily, and it could even amplify the problem.

For clothing that can be bleached, try mixing 4-6 tablespoons of trisodium phosphate (which can usually be found at your local hardware store), one cup of household chlorine bleach, and one gallon of water. Swish around the clothes and work the mixture through the fabric as much as possible, then rinse them with clean water.

When it comes to furniture and other items unable to be thrown in the wash, consult your local dry cleaner on which counteractants would be best to use; he may have several recommendations based on which items were affected, so be sure to tell him the kinds of materials you’ll be treating. He may even be able to suggest items for your laundry if you’re still having trouble removing the odor from clothing.

A major problem with smoke odor is that it can travel quite easily, including through walls and air ducts. Unfortunately, this means it can get trapped in air ducts and cause a recurring odor even months after the fire. Your best option to ensure your entire house gets aired out properly is to consult a professional about thermal fogging, a process that opens the pores of walls and neutralizes the smoke odor. It’s especially helpful in homes with attics, though you’ll likely need to remove odor-absorbing insulation from the attic either way.

While there are plenty of ways to clean up your home and property yourself, keep in mind that bringing in a professional may be the best route for certain tasks. While costly, these experts will know the best ways to get your home back to its pre-fire condition; plus, the expense will likely be significantly less than having to replace items after failed attempts to refurbish them yourself. Keep detailed records and receipts for both you and the insurance company; some of the repairs may be tax-deductible.

The fire recovery process comes with plenty of challenges and frustrations, so be sure you have a strong support system to help you through it. You may even discover that the cleanup process helps your family come together as one and bond, so look for silver linings as often as you can. With time, your home will look more like you remember it — perhaps even better! — and with patience, your emotional wounds will heal, as well.

https://www.redfin.com/blog/2016/08/the-guide-to-cleaning-up-after-a-house-fire.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365, for all of your restoration needs

What is in Smoke Residue/Soot?

9/20/2018 (Permalink)

What is in the Smoke Residue/Soot? All materials involved in a fire cause odors. Typically, soot is representative of what has burned, but may include byproducts that at first seem unrelated to the original material. For example, hydrogen cyanide is a byproduct of burning wool. When wood burns it can produce manganese and benzene. As many products as there are in the world, there are an equal number of byproducts produced in a fire. Each fire is different based on the contents of what has burned during the event. Organic and inorganic materials produce different types of smoke residue or soot. These residues may be present on surfaces that conservators may be tasked with treating. Burnt organic material produces soot that is hard to see and often has a very pungent odor. This is known as protein smoke. It can discolor paints and varnishes. Protein smoke can disperse over large areas and attach itself to everything. How the fire burns and how much moisture is in the air while the fire burns, plays a role in soot deposition on articles. The amount of moisture in the air is a key component in whether the smoke that is produced is wet or dry. There are several types of smoke or soot, which may be present on a surface that conservators might be tasked with treating: Wet Smoke—can present as a sticky residue or soot, and is often associated with a smoldering type of fire and often will have a strong odor. Dry Smoke—associated with a fast-burning fire and occurs at high temperatures. Protein—often present in soot, usually invisible, it can discolor paints and varnishes and often has a very pungent odor. Protein odors could be caused by food on the stove burning slowly or other sources. The slow burn allows the protein to disperse and attach itself to everything, producing a strong odor.

http://www.conservation-us.org/docs/default-source/periodicals/2010-09-sept-aicnews.pdf?sfvrsn=6

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365, for all of your restoration needs

After the Fire! Returning to Normal

8/17/2018 (Permalink)

After the Fire! Returning to Normal A fire will change your life in many ways. Knowing where to begin and who can help you is important. The U.S. Fire Administration hopes you find this information useful in your journey to return tonormal. What to Expect A fire in a home can cause serious damage. The building and many of the things in your home may have been badly damaged by flames, heat, smoke and water. You will find that things the fire did not burn up are now ruined by smoke and soggy with water used to put out the flames. Anything that you want to save or reuse will need to be carefully cleaned. The firefighters may have cut holes in the walls of the building to look for any hidden flames. They may even have cut holes in the roof to let out the heat and smoke. Cleanup will take time and patience. If your home had a home fire sprinkler system, you will find little damage from flames, heat, smoke and water. If you plan to rebuild your home, now is the time to think about installing sprinklers.

https://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/publications/fa_46.pdf

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs!

How to make a fire escape plan

8/14/2018 (Permalink)

How to make a home fire escape plan  

Your ability to get out of your home during a fire depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the smoke alarm sounds. A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors.

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Safety-in-the-home/Escape-planning

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365 for all of your restoration needs.

6 Tips

8/2/2018 (Permalink)

You may think a house fire will never happen to you. But what if it does? Are you prepared?

Figuring out what to do after a home fire can be a very stressful and overwhelming process, and it can be hard to decide what to do first. With a little help from your insurance agent, though, you may be able to settle your claim more quickly and get your life back to normal.

Here are the six things you should do after a home fire.

1. Call your insurance agent immediately.

2. Ask about restoration companies that can help with cleaning up soot, boarding up windows, and other construction.

3. Separate damaged property from undamaged property.

4. Save undamaged property from further destruction.

5. Cooperate fully with the insurance company’s investigation.

6. Find somewhere to stay if you can’t live in your home.

https://blog.equifax.com/credit/six-things-you-need-to-do-after-a-house-fire/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365 for all of your restoration needs. Call us today at 817-557-1447, we're waiting to serve you! 

Tips for fire safety

8/1/2018 (Permalink)

The National Fire Protection Association has announced the theme for its Fire Prevention Week 2018 campaign:Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware – fire can happen anywhere.

Through the annual campaign, set for Oct. 7-13 this year, NFPA aims to raise awareness of “three basic but essential steps to take to reduce the likelihood of having a fire.” Those steps are:
LOOKfor possible fire hazards in your home and eliminate them.
LISTENfor your home’s smoke alarms. Know that you may have only minutes to get out if a fire breaks out.
LEARNtwo ways out of each room of your home. Exits should be easy to access and free of clutter. After leaving the home, go to your family’s designated meeting spot, established when you set up ahome fire escape plan.

NFPA provides resources, including community posters, for the public to use to educate others about home fire safety. For kids, the campaign has activity pages and Simon, a character whoshares messages about fire safety.

http://www.safetyandhealthmagazine.com/articles/17212-fire-prevention-week-2018-look-listen-learn

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of you restoration needs.

Don't postponed your fire restoration

7/26/2018 (Permalink)

When a fire occurs in a home, the aftermath can seem overwhelming, and if fire restoration is postponed, the destruction from smoke damage can become even worse. The longer you wait to address the damage, the more repairs you'll have to fix - which means you'll most likely have a larger bill for damages when all is said and done. You can avoid costly repairs and long-term issues if you make fire damage restoration a priority and follow the steps you'll need to get your home back to normal as soon as possible.

Prolonged Smoke Damage

Fire damage is tricky because some signs are apparent—such as discoloration on walls and ceilings and dark stains from smoke on surfaces—but others are not, such as odors trapped in hidden places. Air conditioner vents, the space behind walls and the outside walls of your home are all areas where ash and soot can be deposited and continue to cause damage if they aren't taken care of in a timely manner.

https://www.resolvebylowes.com/guidance/fire/why-immediate-fire-damage-restoration-is-so-important/115003354947

Call SERVPRO of North Arlington at 817-557-1447. SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 for all of your restoration needs.

How To Properly Use A Fire Extinguisher

4/19/2018 (Permalink)

If you have the slightest doubt about your ability to fight a fire....EVACUATE IMMEDIATELY!

The following steps should be followed when responding to incipient stage fire:

  • Sound the fire alarm and call the fire department, if appropriate.
  • Identify a safe evacuation path before approaching the fire. Do not allow the fire, heat, or smoke to come between you and your evacuation path.
  • Select the appropriate type of fire extinguisher.
  • Discharge the extinguisher within its effective range using the P.A.S.S. technique (pull, aim, squeeze, sweep).
  • Back away from an extinguished fire in case it flames up again.
  • Evacuate immediately if the extinguisher is empty and the fire is not out.
  • Evacuate immediately if the fire progresses beyond the incipient stage.

Most fire extinguishers operate using the following P.A.S.S. technique:

  1. PULL... Pull the pin. This will also break the tamper seal.
  2. AIM... Aim low, pointing the extinguisher nozzle (or its horn or hose) at the base of the fire.

    NOTE: Do not touch the plastic discharge horn on CO2 extinguishers, it gets very cold and may damage skin.

  3. SQUEEZE... Squeeze the handle to release the extinguishing agent.
  4. SWEEP... Sweep from side to side at the base of the fire until it appears to be out. Watch the area. If the fire re-ignites, repeat steps 2 - 4.

If you have the slightest doubt about your ability to fight a fire....EVACUATE IMMEDIATELY! 

Is your home suffering from Fire, Soot or Smoke Damage?

3/27/2018 (Permalink)

Our SERVPRO technicians are standing by to keep things cool!

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of North Arlington will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – (817)557-1447

Phillip's Fire Fiasco!

3/27/2018 (Permalink)

The Martin's Garage. Pre-SERVPRO of North Arlington

A house fire can be especially devastating. In addition to smoke and fire damage, your home may have also suffered from water damage as a result of the firefighting efforts. And even small fires can cause significant smoke and soot damage that affects your entire home.

A Rude Awakening..


Phillip Martin knows this all too well. When he awoke to a house fire on the 21st of December 2017 at 2:00 a.m. "I immediately ran to my daughter's room, pulled her out of bed and ran outside."We got lucky!", Phillip stated. "The fire started in the garage." Which gave me and my wife enough time to get out safely!" Phillip said.

The Martins and their three year old daughter made it out just before the fire spread to the living room.  

"Once Firemen arrived. I remember thinking,"What am I going to do now?" Martin stated.

A Sigh of Relief! 

Mr. Martin spoke to his insurance company, who then recommended SERVPRO of North Arlington. "Once the firemen had extinguished the fire. I felt both relieved and anxious, but once I called SERVPRO of North Arlington my anxiety began to fade." Phillip expressed. 

We assured Mr.Martin that our local SERVPRO North Arlington technicians would be arriving within the hour. 

As fire and water restoration specialists, SERVPRO of North Arlington has the specialized training and experience necessary to restore your home back to pre-fire condition.

 "Once SERVPRO North Arlington arrived they immediately sprung into action. My family was able to return our home within just two days of the incident! Martin stated. 

"Without SERVPRO North Arlington I have no idea what I would have done! 

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – (817)557-1447

How to handle a fire in a commercial building

12/15/2017 (Permalink)

A fire can be devastating to a commercial business, but after the fire truck and firefighters have left, the real work has just begun. What can a professional fire damage restoration company do for a business with commercial fire damage? We'll find out.

When the firefighters and fire trucks have cleared the building of a commercial fire, a trained fire damage specialist will inspect the site to see what materials were affected by smoke damage or soot damage. The building may not be safe for anyone to work in until a commercial fire damage specialist has started work. For example, the roof may need to be boarded up and spread with tarps for the safety and security of the workers. When there's an electrical fire or fire damage to the electrical system, generators may need to be installed for temporary power. A commercial fire damage company can remove burned trees as well.

A fire hose can pump thousands of gallons of water per minute, and that water will have to be removed before the work of fire restoration can really begin. If the fire sprinkler system does its job, it can stop a lot of fire damage before it occurs. A working fire suppression system is essential to reducing damage, but the fire suppression system can also drench everything, so a lot of water from the fire hoses or fire sprinkler system may need to be removed.

One area that needs to be handled carefully is smoke and soot damage. Soot Damage is a major problem after a commercial fire, discoloring anything close to the flames. Within hours, soot damage can turn fiberglass and appliance finishes yellow. Soot damage can also tarnish metals and cause corrosion. After a few days, the smoke damage will also permanently discolor upholstery, clothing, and walls. The lingering smell of smoke can be reduced by cleaning with the proper detergents or sealing up and removing objects that are too damaged. The sooner commercial fire damage professionals are brought in, the better.

A utility room fire will often require special attention because the fire might have started in the utility room because some utility room fires are caused by storage of flammable chemicals. With the fire extinguished, a utility room fire might have burned important equipment that will need to be repaired or replaced. There also may be an electrical fire in the utility room fire that needs to be dealt with. Smoke damage can also be concentrated in the utility room's small space.

An electrical fire could have burned much of the building, and the fire hoses and fire sprinkler system might have soaked the drywall and insulation, so a fire restoration professional may need to replace it to prevent the growth of mold and mildew. Firefighters do a great job putting out fires, but they can't worry about the damage they leave behind. In some cases, the firefighters might have broken through walls or windows or the fire truck itself might have collided with the building, causing more damage. Fire restoration specialists will need to deal with that, too. The fire restoration professional can also look at the fire suppression system to make sure it will work the next time.

When it comes to hiring a commercial fire damage specialist, it's important to hire the best available. Fire restoration may involve a lot of work, because an electrical fire, soot damage, and smoke damage are all major problems, but the right professionals can take care of them. A fire sprinkler system or fire suppression system is critical to keep a fire from spreading, and a fire truck and a fire hose can save lives, but only a fire restoration professional can get a business running again.

Call SERVPRO North Arlington at 817-557-1447  for more information on fire damage.

Christmas tree safety

12/7/2017 (Permalink)

Did you know that a spark can turn a dry Christmas tree into a torch within 12 seconds?

Christmas tree fires are rare, but they still account for roughly 200 home fires each year, destroying an annual $14 million in the process, the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) says. They're deadly, too, killing an average of six people yearly.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission released Christmas tree tips:

  • Fresh, watered trees are much less likely to catch fire. So when buying a tree, look for branches with vibrant, green needles that don’t come off the branch easily.
  • Make sure your tree is at least three feet from any heat source, like a fireplace, heat vent or candle.
  • Water your tree daily.
  • If you buy an artificial tree, make sure it’s labeled “fire resistant.”
  • Do not forget to cut off 2 inches from the bottom of the tree to allow it to soak up water.

SERVPRO of North Arlington would like to wish all of our customers and vendors a very Merry Christmas!

If you are need of our services during this holiday season SERVPRO of North Arlington is on call 24/7.  Call our office at 817-557-1447. We are here to help!

Arlington Smoke and Soot Cleanup

8/18/2017 (Permalink)

Smoke and Soot Damage Can Cause a Pervasive Odor in Your Arlington Home

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of North Arlington will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – 
817-557-1447

Do you have a fire in your home?

8/18/2017 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of South Arlington will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – 
817-557-1505

Bathroom Exhaust Fan

11/1/2013 (Permalink)

Total Loss Fire

This house was a total loss because something as simple as a dirty bathroom exhaust fan.