Recent Storm Damage Posts

Staying Safe After a Storm

11/13/2019 (Permalink)

Staying Safe After a Storm

  • Listen to the radio for advisories and other instructions.
  • Do not venture outside until it has been declared safe to do so.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and avoid standing water or metal objects near downed wires.
  • Leave and do not enter buildings that have sustained structural damage.
  • Stay away from damaged trees and dangling or broken limbs.
  • Do not swim or wade in flood waters.
  • Check on neighbors, especially those who are elderly or disabled.
  • Watch out for snakes or other wild animals.
  • Turn the gas off at the meter if you smell gas.
  • Do not drive unless absolutely necessary.
  • If you must drive, watch for undermined roads and damaged bridges.
  • Do not attempt to drive through flooded streets or bridges.
  • Avoid using candles or other open flames indoors.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher handy at all times.
  • Test battery powered smoke and CO alarms.
  • Make sure your sewer system is working before flushing toilets.
  • Keep pets indoors and use a leash when taking them outside.
  • Operate generators outdoors in the open away from windows and doors.
  • Don’t eat perishable food that has warmed to over 40° F.

https://todayshomeowner.com/dealing-with-storm-damage-to-your-home/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your mitigation and restoration needs.

Types of Weather Damage That May Be Covered

11/13/2019 (Permalink)

Types of Weather Damage That May Be Covered

The most common types of weather-related damage include:

Although not all damage is covered by standard homeowners' insurance, most of the above items are, with flood damage being the major exception. Flood damage is not usually covered by most home insurance companies. However, you may be able to buy flood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program. You can find out more about national flood insurance on the FEMA website.

Damage that crosses boundary lines can raise questions about whose responsibility it is to cover repairs. If a toppled tree damages your home and your neighbor's, both you and your neighbor should contact your respective insurance companies. Your insurance providers will help determine responsibility and how to pay for repairs.

https://www.thebalance.com/weather-water-damage-home-insurance-coverage-3862186

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

How to Prepare Your Home for a Storm

10/14/2019 (Permalink)

Clear limbs and trim trees

During a storm, dead tree limbs can get loose and cause damage to a home’s exterior or even puncture a window. Heavy rain can also cause trees with shallow root systems to pull out of the ground.

Secure fences

Ensure that your fences are properly secured so to help prevent them from being lifted up and thrown against the house by heavy winds.

Secure furniture

Heavy winds can cause items like patio furniture and large toys to damage the exterior of your home. It’s a good idea to anchor outdoor furniture or bring it indoors before a storm hits. You should also move anything in your yard that can become flying debris inside your house or garage.

Check Gutters

Help Prevent damage inside your house by having downspouts drain away from you home and clear your gutters of any debris.

 https://blog.nationwide.com/news/storm-preparation-tips-for-home/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Its never too early to prepare

10/14/2019 (Permalink)

It's never too early to prepare your family and your home for severe weather.

The basics

  • Know the severe weather risks in your area.
  • Prepare a Storm Readiness Kit.
  • Sit down with your family and develop a planin case of severe weather.
  • Take pictures or videos of your house and valuables for insurance purposes.

Hurricanes

  • Prepare shutters or other coverings for doors and windows.
  • Reinforce the roof trusses—a cool-weather job.
  • Examine and repair roof shingles—do it while the weather’s cool or overcast.
  • Caulkopenings, flashings and soffits.
  • Reinforce the entry doorsand round up exterior covering as required.
  • Replace hard mulch with soft material.
  • Buy and install a backflow-prevention device in your sewer line.
  • Trim your trees and bushes.
  • Purchase supplies for your Storm Readiness Kit.
  • Purchase generator, gas cans, carbon monoxide detectors and extension cords.
  • Decide how to tie down large outdoor equipment, and purchase supplies.
  • Reinforce or replace your garage door.
  • Purchase supplies for cleanup and repair.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/smart-homeowner/prepare-your-home-for-a-storm-checklist/

 SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Prepare your home for Storms

10/14/2019 (Permalink)

Spring is known for its rapidly changing weather — and that can mean severe storms. Help get your home and family ready with these tips.

Stow your gear. When strong winds are forecast, secure patio furniture and other yard items or put them in your garage or a shed so they don't become dangerous projectiles.

Cover up. Close and secure storm shutters if your home has them. Keep blinds and shades drawn and tape or tack window coverings around the edges to help protect you from broken, flying glass. Tie thick blankets over vehicles that are exposed to the elements to diminish damage from hail.

If power outages are common in your area, prepare an emergency kit and keep it in a central location in your home.

Basic supplies should include:

  • Flashlight and fresh batteries
  • Battery or solar-powered weather radio and/or transistor radio
  • First aid supplies
  • Hand sanitizer or wipes
  • Three-day supply of canned or dried food and water

https://www.statefarm.com/simple-insights/residence/prepare-your-home-for-spring-storms

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

preparedness

9/17/2019 (Permalink)

You can’t stop a tropical storm or hurricane, but you can take steps now to protect you and your family.

If you live in areas at risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages you to be prepared for hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year.

Please follow these important hurricane preparedness tips from CDC:

https://www.cdc.gov/features/hurricanepreparedness/index.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

After a storm

9/17/2019 (Permalink)

After a hurricane has passed

If you and your family were forced to leave your home – or if it has been severely damaged from the hurricane – wait for authorities to give the all-clear to re-enter. Then:

  • Look for flooding in the wake of a hurricane. Rising water can produce dangerous conditions hours or even days later.
  • Check for structural damage before going inside.
  • If dark, use a flashlight – not matches, a candle or a lighter. An open flame could ignite leaking gas.
  • Listen for reports to see when drinking water is safe.
  • If there is water damage, consider hiring a professional water damage cleaning service.
  • Otherwise, begin your cleanup as soon as possible – washing and disinfecting items that have been touched by floodwater or disposing of items that cannot be saved.
  • Wear a mask, gloves and coveralls when cleaning up your property to reduce exposure to hazardous material.
  • Use your cell phone or camera to take pictures of the damage that can be used to document your insurance claim.
  • Once you’ve gathered necessary documents and evidence of your claim, contact your insurance company or agent.

https://www.nationwide.com/hurricanes.jsp

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Before a hurricane

9/7/2019 (Permalink)

Before a Hurricane:

All proper preparations should be done before the hurricane hits to ensure that you aren't left without certain necessities. When a major hurricane is headed toward an area, people tend to panic, and stores run out of essential staples like water, batteries, and flashlights very quickly.

Truthfully, if you live in a hurricane-prone area, you should always be stocked with the staples, so you never have to worry about the panicking crowds. You should also be prepared if you're traveling to an area that may be affected by these severe storms.

  • Make a Plan: When an emergency strikes, you and your family must have a plan in case you get separated. Agree on a common meeting place that is easy to find and a method of contact. Additionally, you'll want to know the safest place to hunker down during the storm, so stake out a location away from any windows when you arrive where you can take shelter.
  • Create a disaster kit: Whether you're visiting a hurricane-prone area or you live there, you should prepare a disaster kitin case of a sudden storm. This should consist of water (1 gallon per person per day for three days), three days’ worth of food, batteries, flashlights, a first aid kit, a cell phone with back up charger, a help whistle, garbage bags, pliers, a manual can opener, and any critical medications. Your valuable documents should be tucked away in a waterproof container as well.
  • Fill all of your gas tanks: This should be done as soon as possible because gas is usually one of the first things to run out before a hurricane.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/staying-safe-during-hurricane-1513589

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs. 

During a Hurricane

9/7/2019 (Permalink)

During a Hurricane:

During the storm, howling winds, driving rain, and the threat of tornadoes can make riding out a hurricane scary. Follow these tips for staying safe in your home during a hurricane:

  • Stay inside and away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. Find a safe area in your home (an interior room like a closet or bathroom on the lower level).
  • If flooding threatens your home, turn off electricity at the main breaker.
  • If you lose power, turn off major appliances such as the air conditioner and water heater to reduce damage.
  • Do not use electrical appliances, including your computer.
  • Do not go outside. If the eye of the storm passes over your area, there will be a short period of calm, but at the other side of the eye, the wind speed rapidly increases to hurricane force and will come from the opposite direction. Also, do not go outside to see "what the wind feels like." It is too easy to be hit by flying debris.
  • Beware of lightning. Stay away from electrical equipment and don't use the phone or take a bath/shower during the storm.

https://www.tripsavvy.com/staying-safe-during-hurricane-1513589

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Thunderstorm

9/7/2019 (Permalink)

Thunderstorms, lightning and hail

Thunderstorms are often accompanied by high winds, hail, lightning, heavy rain and in rare cases can produce tornadoes. Hail is formed when updrafts in thunderclouds carry raindrops upward into extremely cold areas of the atmosphere, where they freeze and merge into lumps of ice.

  • Thunderstorms and lightning occur throughout Canada but less frequently in the North. On average, 10 people die each year in Canada and up to 160 are injured during such storms.
  • Thunderstorms are usually over within an hour, although a series of thunderstorms can last several hours.
  • Hailstorms occur across Canada, mostly from May to October. They are most frequent in Alberta, the southern Prairies and in southern Ontario.
  • Some hailstones are the size of peas while others can be as big as grapefruits.
  • Hail comes down at great speed, especially when accompanied by high winds and can cause serious injuries and damages.

What to do if outside

  • If you are caught outside and you can see lightning or hear thunder, you are in danger of being hit. Seek shelter immediately either in an enclosed building or a hard-topped vehicle. There is no safe place outside in a thunderstorm.
  • If caught outside far from a safe location, stay away from tall objects, such as trees, poles, wires and fences. Take shelter in a low-lying area.
  • Wait 30 minutes after the last rumble of thunder before going outside again.

https://www.getprepared.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/svrstrms-wtd/index-en.aspx

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Preparing for a hurricane

9/5/2019 (Permalink)

Preparing for a hurricane, If you have time do this;

  • Fill plastic bottles with clean water for drinking.
  • Fill bathtubs and sinks with water for flushing the toilet or washing the floor or clothing.
  • Fill your car's gas tank, in case an evacuation notice is issued.
  • Turn off propane tanks and unplug small appliances.
  • Bring in anything that can be picked up by the wind, such as bicycles and patio furniture.
  • Move your furniture and valuables to higher floors of your home.
  • Turn off utilities if told to do so by authorities to prevent damage to your home or within the community. If you shut your gas off, a professional is required to turn it back on.
  • Unplug small appliances to reduce potential damage from power surges that may occur.

If you have pets or livestock:

  • Consider a precautionary evacuation of your animals, especially any large or numerous animals. Waiting until the last minute could be fatal for them and dangerous for you.
  • Where possible, move livestock to higher ground. If using a horse or other trailer to evacuate your animals, move sooner rather than later.
  • Bring your companion animals indoors and maintain direct control of them. Be sure that your pet emergency kitis ready to go in case of evacuation.

https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/hurricane.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

After a Hurricane

9/5/2019 (Permalink)

Returning home safely;

  • Stay out of any building that has water around it.
  • Keep away from loose or dangling power lines. Report them immediately to the power company.
  • Follow these tips for inspecting your home’s structure and utilities & systems after a hurricane.
  • Take pictures of home damage, both of the buildings and its contents, for insurance purposes.

Cleaning and repairing your home;

  • Wear protective clothing, including rubber gloves and rubber boots, and be cautious when cleaning up.
  • Learn more about how to clean up after a hurricane, including the supplies you’ll need, how to deal with contaminated food and water, and how to repair water damage.
  • Don’t just repair your home, build in hurricane-resistant features to help protect against future storms:
    • Secure double entry doors at the top and bottom.
    • Strengthen garage doors to improve wind resistance, particularly double-wide garage doors.
    • Select trees that are not as subject to uprooting to replace any damaged ones. A gardening or landscaping professional can give you excellent advice.
    • If your home has been significantly damaged and will require rebuilding parts or all of it, consider building a safe room.

https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/hurricane.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Hurricane Safety

9/5/2019 (Permalink)

Hurricane season officially starts June 1st and lasts until November 30th. Hurricanes can sometimes spawn tornadoes. If you live in a hurricane prone area, make sure you know where all of the evacuation routes are. Always listen to the radio and television for the latest information and instructions for your area.

A HURRICANE WATCH issued for your part of the coast indicates the possibility that you could experience hurricane conditions within 36 hours. This WATCH should trigger your family's disaster plan, and protective measures should be initiated. Especially, those actions that require extra time such as securing a boat and leaving a barrier island.

A HURRICANE WARNING issued for your part of the coast indicates that sustained winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 24 hours. Once this WARNING has been issued, your family should be in the process of completing protective actions and deciding the safest location to be during the storm.

https://www.weatherwizkids.com/weather-safety-hurricane.htm

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs. 

Hurricane

9/4/2019 (Permalink)

Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move toward land. Potential threats from hurricanes include powerful winds, heavy rainfall, storm surges, coastal and inland flooding, rip currents, tornadoes, and landslides. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The Pacific hurricane season runs May 15 to November 30. Hurricanes: *Can happen along any U.S. coast or in any territory in the Atlantic or Pacific oceans. *Can affect areas more than 100 miles inland. *Are most active in September. If you are under a Hurricane warning, find a safe shelter right away!

  • Determine how to best protect yourself from high winds and flooding. *Evacuate if told to do so, *Take refuge in a designated storm shelter, or an interior room for high winds.
  • Listen for emergency information and alerts.
  • Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.
  • Turn around, Don’t Drown! Do not walk, swim, or drive through flood waters.

https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Hurricane is 36 hours away

9/4/2019 (Permalink)

  • Turn on your TV or radio in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
  • Restock your emergency preparedness kit. Include food and water sufficient for at least three days, medications, a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies.
  • Plan how to communicate with family members if you lose power. For example, you can call, text, email or use social media. Remember that during disasters, sending text messages is usually reliable and faster than making phone calls because phone lines are often overloaded.
  • Review your evacuation zone, evacuation route and shelter locations. Plan with your family. You may have to leave quickly so plan ahead.
  • Keep your car in good working condition, and keep the gas tank full; stock your vehicle with emergency supplies and a change of clothes.
  • If you have NFIP flood insurance, your policy may cover up to $1000 in loss avoidance measures, like sandbags and water pumps, to protect your insured property. You should keep copies of all receipts and a record of the time spent performing the work. They should be submitted to your insurance adjuster when you file a claim to be reimbursed. Visit www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/137860 to learn more.

https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Be safe after a hurricane

9/4/2019 (Permalink)

Be safe AFTER:

  • Listen to authorities for information and special instructions.
  • Be careful during clean-up. Wear protective clothing and work with someone else.
  • Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off electricity at the main breaker or fuse box to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in flood water, which can contain dangerous debris. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
  • Document any property damage with photographs. Contact your insurance company for assistance.

https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24 hours a day, 7 days a week ready to help you with all of your restoration / mitigation needs! Call us today.

How to prevent storm damage

8/16/2019 (Permalink)

Think about your landscaping

Having creative landscaping designed to guide water away from your home’s foundation can help prevent flooding in your home. It's important that the ground slopes away from your house. There should be a slope of a quarter- inch per foot heading downhill away from your home's foundation. If you need to, add some soil to create this grade. Take advantage of gravity to pull the water away from the house and prevent summer storm damage. 

Pack up outdoor furniture- Here’s the deal:

Your patio table and chairs look great. But in a storm, they can get turned into missiles if they get picked up by a strong gust of wind. And then they can get thrown right into your house. Ouch.

Anyways, be sure to pack up all your outdoor furniture and decorations to prevent that from happening. Avoid the chair-smashes-a-window scenario and spare yourself the headache of dealing with the storm damage.

Know how to shut off your utilities 

If the weather gets really severe, you may need to turn off your utilities. Know how to do this ahead of time so you’re not guessing and saying “umm” a lot when a storm hits.

https://insurancehub.com/prevent-storm-damage/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Protect your home

8/16/2019 (Permalink)

Install a Standby Generator

 You’ll have electricity to run essential appliances and your central air system. A standby generator can even reduce your chances of flood damage by keeping your sump pump running.

It’s permanently installed outside your home and fueled by liquid propane or natural gas. Since it’s wired directly into your home’s electrical system, it can automatically restore power in seconds. Price depends on the size of your home and the amount of wattage needed, anywhere from around $3,000 to $16,000.

Tip: If the ticket price is too high, you can opt for a portable generator. They’re fueled by gasoline or propane, and are powerful enough to keep a few appliances and some lights running. Most big-box stores sell portable generators with prices starting at $299. Try the generator-buying guide from “Consumer Reports” for product reviews.

https://www.houselogic.com/finances-taxes/home-insurance/extreme-weather-climate-change/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Protect Your Home from Severe Weather

8/7/2019 (Permalink)

Consider Steel Doors
After you’ve made shutters for all your windows, start working on your doors. If you live in an area that frequently gets heavy storms, consider installing steel entry doors. High winds can easily tear through double doors, French doors and sliding patio doors that have no structural support between the two sides. 

You may need to purchase and install special hardware to more adequately secure the doors where they meet. Try bolts that fasten the door into the framing at the top and the bottom.     

Remember your roof

A roof in good condition can shield your home's interior from the storm outside. So roof work is another essential step in preparing your house to withstand a severe storm. Apply sealing around your home’s chimney or vent pipes. This will help prevent water from seeping into your home. Hire a contractor to check the structural integrity of the roof system.

Clean out clogged gutters and downspouts. If the rain that accompanies a heavy storm can’t run through the gutters and downspouts, it will spill over the sides, landing in areas where it can soak through to your home’s foundation, causing flooding and structural damage.

https://www.nahb.org/consumers/homeownership/homeownership-articles/protect-your-home-from-severe-weather.aspx

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

How to prevent storm damage to your home:

8/7/2019 (Permalink)

Check your yard for dead or diseased trees.

This is a big one for preventing storm maintenance. You may want to call in a trustworthy tree expert to check your yard for dangerous trees.

How can a tree be dangerous?

Well, if the tree is dead, hollowed, or diseased, it may not be able to stand up to the strong winds and rains of a summer storm. Meaning that you may end up with a tree crashing into your house…which is not good. Fortunately, home insurance typically covers falling trees, but it’s best just to get the unsafe trees removed so they don’t put anyone in danger. Or smash your home.

 Secure furniture that could fall.

If you’ve got heavy, tall furniture that could fall, such as bookshelves or cabinets, make sure to anchor them to the wall so they’re secure and won’t fall. Also, move furniture away from the doors or windows.

Have your roof inspected every year.

It’s important to have your roof inspected and maintained each year. This will help you catch any issues and correct them before they get too serious. It’s best to fortify and strengthen your roof so it’s ready to take the walloping of a summer storm. Roof maintenance can even help you save money on your home insurance rates.

https://insurancehub.com/prevent-storm-damage/

 SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Staying safe after a storm

8/6/2019 (Permalink)

Dealing with wind or water damage to your home caused by hurricanes, tornadoes, or other severe storms can be both difficult and dangerous. Here are some tips on how keep your family safe and begin to get your life back together after a storm hits.

Staying Safe After a Storm

  • Listen to the radio for advisories and other instructions.
  • Do not venture outside until it has been declared safe to do so.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and avoid standing water or metal objects near downed wires.
  • Leave and do not enter buildings that have sustained structural damage.
  • Stay away from damaged trees and dangling or broken limbs.
  • Do not swim or wade in flood waters.
  • Check on neighbors, especially those who are elderly or disabled.
  • Watch out for snakes or other wild animals.
  • Turn the gas off at the meter if you smell gas.
  • Do not drive unless absolutely necessary.
  • If you must drive, watch for undermined roads and damaged bridges.
  • Do not attempt to drive through flooded streets or bridges.
  • Avoid using candles or other open flames indoors.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher handy at all times.
  • Test battery powered smoke and CO alarms.
  • Make sure your sewer system is working before flushing toilets.
  • Keep pets indoors and use a leash when taking them outside.
  • Operate generators outdoors in the open away from windows and doors.
  • Don’t eat perishable food that has warmed to over 40° F.

https://www.todayshomeowner.com/dealing-with-storm-damage-to-your-home/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

After a storm

8/6/2019 (Permalink)

What should I do after my house has been damaged by a storm?

Federal Assistance

The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides a variety of assistance to victims of storm damage. You can get help with temporary housing, with repairs, with meals for your family and with filing insurance claims. Contact the FEMA branch in your area. If the storm damaged many homes in your area, a FEMA representative may be traveling through your neighborhood or available at a local temporary FEMA office. So talk to your local representative for assistance.

Documenting Damage

You'll need to document the damage that has been done by the storm as soon as possible, particularly if your homeowner's insurance only covers certain types of damage. Take photos of the damage, and be sure to document any potential problems, such as mold, crumbling drywall or exposed power lines. It's a good idea to have pictures on file of the normal state of your house. So if you're concerned about a storm that hasn't hit yet, take photos both before and after the storm.

https://homeguides.sfgate.com/should-after-house-damaged-storm-58794.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

How does storm damage affect my home over time?

7/8/2019 (Permalink)

Worn down weather stripping

Brand new replacement windows can have strong, leakproof seals and weather stripping that protect your home from moisture, wind, and drafts. As the years pass, however, storms and daily wear (including ultraviolet rays) can break down seals, make your glass more brittle, and damaged weather stripping. Hire a professional to inspect your windows, especially if you notice leaks or temperature problems during a storm. It might be time for repairs or window replacement.

Lost curb appeal and home value

If you don’t keep up with home maintenance before and after storms, you could risk siding stains, dented gutters, lost shingles, broken windows, and many other things that lower the aesthetic value and curb appeal of your home. Aside from keeping your home safe, invest in maintenance and timely repairs to maintain the appearance of your home. Make storm damage prevention and repair easy.

https://www.mrroof.com/blog/storm-damage-affect-home-time/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

when it comes to a storm

7/2/2019 (Permalink)

When it comes to storm damage, basic upkeep goes a long way

  1. Replacing missing or damaged shingles: if a shingle is damaged, it’s more likely to break free. If it’s missing, well then, you’ve got a gap for wind to get under and do even more damage
  2. Repair loose siding: he same rules as roofing apply to siding: it’s important to ensure your siding isn’t damaged
  3. Ensure water can flow away from your home: The grade of your lot should keep water flowing away from your home and into a ditch, drain, or some other proper retention area.
  4. Keep your gutters clear: Make sure your gutters are free-flowing and your downspouts flow away from your foundation.
  5. Keep your sump pump in working order: Before Spring rains start up, we suggest checking whether your sump pump is in working order. If you want to feel extra-secure, having a backup sump pump is a sure-fire way to prevent basement flooding.

https://www.reinbrechthomes.com/10-steps-to-protect-your-home-from-storm-damage/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs.

Tornado information

5/14/2019 (Permalink)

  • April, May and June are the peak months for tornadoes in the United States.
  • Intense tornadoes are more likely to occur during the spring.
  • Many of the worst tornado outbreaks have struck in April or May.

April kicks off what is typically the most active and dangerous three-month period of the year for tornadoes in the United States.

Strong tornadoes can occur in any month, as we saw in early March when 23 people were killed by an EF4 twister in Lee County, Alabama. But weather history shows April, May and June are the months with the most potential of having both the greatest number of tornadoes and the most intense tornadoes in a given year.

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/news/2018-03-27-april-may-june-tornadoes-peak-months

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7, 365 for all of your restoration needs.

Tornado warnings in DFW

5/1/2019 (Permalink)

Storms are already firing up to the northwest of Fort Worth and severe weather will likely reach the Dallas-Fort Worth area later on Wednesday.

tornado warning has already been issued for portions of Archer and Baylor counties, about 110 miles northwest of Fort Worth. About 125 miles northwest of Fort Worth, a tornado warning was also in effect for Throckmorton and Haskell counties.

severe thunderstorm watch was also in effect for counties northwest of Fort Worth, including Wise, Palo Pinto and Jack counties until 8 p.m.

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article229911089.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs

Tornado season

4/2/2019 (Permalink)

It’s that time of year to start worrying about the spring storm season. And one private weather forecaster, AccuWeather, is predicting a higher frequency of severe storm risks in Tornado Alley, which will include parts of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

The Dallas-Fort Worth area is often considered to be on the southern end of Tornado Alley, though one study has suggested it may be shifting eastward.

“We believe that the more traditional severe weather region of the central and southern Plains will have a higher potential for tornadoes and severe weather more frequently than they have experienced on average the past three years,” Paul Pastelok, AccuWeather’s Lead Long-Range Meteorologist, said in a news release.

https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/community/fort-worth/article226799754.html

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs!

HURRICANE SEASON 2018: WHEN WILL IT END, BE OVER?

11/19/2018 (Permalink)

The hurricane season for 2018 may be coming to an end in November but that doesn’t mean more storms won’t form in the Atlantic or Pacific that can cause significant damage. The latest storm to wreak havoc on the United States, Hurricane Michael, was still making its way out of the country Thursday.

The storm made landfall near Mexico Beach, Florida, Wednesday and then continued north before crossing over Georgia and heading into the Carolinas and southeast Virginia. The storm was a Category 4 with wind speeds over 150 miles per hour and it caused significant and deadly damage after its arrival in Florida.

Hurricane season in the Atlantic started June 1 and has a few weeks left to go until it’s over. The season runs until November 30 and though storms can happen after the season is over the bulk of them usually happen within the June 1 to November 30 window. Thursday, in addition to Michael, there were Hurricane Leslie and Tropical Storm Nadine in the Atlantic.

In the Pacific, the hurricane season starts a bit earlier than in the Atlantic. The Eastern Pacific season begins May 15 and continues until November 30. Tropical Storm Sergio was brewing in the Pacific Thursday while those on the Atlantic coast were watching the remnants of Michael.

Every hurricane starts as a tropical cyclone and only becomes a hurricane when its maximum sustained wind speeds reach 74 miles per hour or higher. The cyclone first becomes a tropical depression with wind speeds of 38 miles per hour or higher and then a tropical storm when the wind speeds are between 39 and 73 miles per hour. All of these storms originate in tropical or subtropical waters

The Atlantic hurricane season peaks around the middle of September until the end of October. A chart from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows the frequency of hurricanes and tropical storms by month over a period of more than 100 years.

https://www.newsweek.com/hurricane-season-2018-end-when-1165716

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Above average storm activity in 2018

10/15/2018 (Permalink)

'Above-average' storm activity so far in 2018 hurricane season, expert says

The 2018 hurricane season has so far seen above-average storm activity and a near-normal number of major hurricanes, according to Colorado State University meteorologist Phillip Klotzbach.

Earlier in the season, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's revised forecast issued Aug. 9 noted forecasters expected a "below-normal" season with up to 13 named storms for the entire season, at least four of were to be hurricanes. This hurricane season's first forecast -- issued April 5 -- called for a "slightly above-average" season.  

With approximately 45 days left in hurricane season, the Atlantic has already seen 14.

According to data collected by Klotzbach, the 14 named storms exceeds the 12.1 average for Atlantic storm activity in an entire season. This year has already seen about 82 named stormed days, whereas in years past, about 59 days is the average. There have also been seven hurricanes, surpassing the average five. 

Major hurricanes are ranking at about average; the Atlantic has seen two so far this year, whereas the average is recorded at 2.7. This season has seen five major hurricane days, with an average set at 6.2.Hurricane season extends through Nov. 30. 

https://www.nola.com/weather/index.ssf/2018/10/2018_hurricane_season_sees_abo.html

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Hurricane Michael

10/11/2018 (Permalink)

Michael Treks Through Southeast After Leaving Florida Beach Towns in Ruins, Kills 2; Flooding Swamps North Carolina Towns

When Hurricane Michael made landfall as a high-end Category 4 storm on the Florida Panhandle Wednesday, buildings along the coast were smashed to pieces, storm-surge flooding lapped at the eaves of beach houses and an Air Force base sustained extensive damage. Two people have died in the storm, which continued to zip across Georgia and the Carolinas Thursday morning.

One death was reported in the Panhandle. A Greensboro man was killed when a tree crashed on his home, according to Gadsden County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Anglie Hightower. In southern Georgia, an 11-year-old girl was killed when a carport hit her home in Seminole County. The county coroner later identified her as Sarah Radney.

In Florida, from Panama City through Mexico Beach — where the storm made landfall — and into Apalachicola, houses were swamped or blown apart, roofs were ripped off, boats sank and trees toppled in the high winds. Aerial images at Mexico Beach Thursday morning showed extreme damage, with homes swept completely off their foundations and destroyed and few properties left standing along the coast.

"Mexico Beach took the brunt," FEMA Administrator Brock Long said. "That’s probably ground zero."

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2018-10-11-hurricane-michael-damage-florida-georgia-alabama-carolina

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Tropical Storm Rosa

10/2/2018 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm Rosa is about to make landfall and drench the arid Southwest

Deserts aren't supposed to get much rain, but Tropical Storm Rosa is flipping the script.

Rosa is expected make landfall Monday evening on Mexico's Baja California, CNN meteorologist Gene Norman said.The storm will douse Baja California with 3 to 6 inches of rain, with some spots getting up to 10 inches, the National Hurricane Center said.As it moves northeast Rosa will also dump 2 to 4 inches of rain on much of Arizona, with up to 6 inches in the Arizona mountains.  Historically, it's unusual for the US Southwest to get pummeled by a hurricane or tropical storm. But "these events have begun to increase in recent years," Norman said.Research indicates that global warming contributes to tropical storms getting "more intense, bigger and longer-lasting, thereby increasing their potential for damage," said Kevin Trenberth, senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research.While there might not be a direct link between global warming and the recent increase of severe storms in the US Southwest, "it is possible that this could be a side effect of climate change," Norman said."Warmer oceans are allowing eastern Pacific storms to reach higher latitudes," he said. "This was not the case earlier. It was quite rare for an eastern Pacific storm to even reach Baja California, and this now becoming more common." https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/01/weather/tropical-storm-rosa-wxc/index.html SERVPRO of North Arlington is here for all of your restoration needs

Tropical Storm Kirk reemerges, strengthens in Atlantic, forecasters say

9/27/2018 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm Kirk, which lost strength and had dissipated earlier this week as it crossed the tropical Atlantic, has strengthened and reemerged Tuesday, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami. Forecasters say little additional change in strength is expected through Thursday and is expected to weaken as it crosses over the eastern Caribbean Sea.

According to the NHC's 5  p.m. EDT advisory, Kirk was located about 260 miles east of Barbados and about 380 miles east-southeast of Martinique, moving west-northwest at about 18 mph. The storm is packing maximum sustained winds of 60 mph with tropical storm-force winds reaching outward up to 115 miles from the center.

NHC's forecast says the center of Kirk will move over the Lesser Antilles by Thursday afternoon.

In the Pacific coast, weather officials are monitoring Hurricane Rosa. Forecasters said it is expected to strengthen but doesn't pose an immediate threat to land.

Tropical storm warning

  • The NHC announced a tropical storm warning for Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Martinique and Guadeloupe with tropical storm conditions that may happen within the next 36 hours.

Tropical storm watch

  • NHC said a tropical storm watch is in effect for St. Vincent and the Grenadines -- with tropical storm conditions appearing within the next 36 hours.

Possible rain fall

  • NHC says Kirk can produce total rainfall of 4 to 6 inches across the northern Windward and southern Leeward Islands -- with isolated maximum totals up to 10 inches across Martinique and Dominica. They warn of life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.

Latest forecast track

  • The NHC released an image showing Kirk's forecasted movement through the next couple of days

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/tropical-storm-kirk-strengthens-atlantic-national-hurricane-center-latest-forecast-path-track-today-2018-09-26/

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Atlantic hurricane season ramps up again with development of Leslie, Kirk

9/24/2018 (Permalink)

Atlantic hurricane season ramps up again with development of Leslie, Kirk

Following a brief lull in tropical weather across the Atlantic Basin, several areas of interest developed this past weekend, including the season's newest named storms.

Tropical Storm Kirk developed on Saturday morning. It formed at 8.3 degrees north latitude, making it the lowest latitude at which an Atlantic named storm has formed since 1902. Kirk weakened into a tropical depression late Sunday evening but is currently a tropical rainstorm. 

Kirk is moving through an area of relatively dry air, which will limit opportunities for intensification, according to Kottlowski.

"Kirk will not be a threat to land during the next few days," Kottlowski said. This will give those potentially in its track plenty of time to prepare.

The first areas to feel the impacts of Kirk will likely be the Windward Islands of the eastern Caribbean. Swells churned up by the storm could be noticeable on eastern-facing shores by midweek.

"It could threaten parts of the Windward Islands with strong to perhaps damaging winds and heavy rainfall by Thursday or Friday," Kottlowski warned.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic, Subtropical Storm Leslie formed on Sunday morning between Bermuda and the Azores. 

Leslie is expected to slowly drift eastward over the next 24-48 hours while it maintains its status as a tropical storm.

No impacts to land are expected during this time, and Leslie will likely dissipate over the open waters of the Atlantic by midweek.

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/the-tropics-are-heating-up-again-tropical-depression-kirk-and-subtropical-storm-leslie-churn-in-the-atlantic/70006140

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Hurricane season isn't over yet!

9/21/2018 (Permalink)

There is still more of hurricane season to go': Expert warns another tropical threat may make US landfall

Even though the tropical Atlantic is void of organized storms at this time, conditions may again get busy over the next couple of weeks with a few areas of potential development.

Sept. 10 marked the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season from a climatology standpoint. However, hurricane season does not officially end until Nov. 30. The coming weeks into mid-October often bring several additional tropical storms and hurricanes. This year may not be any exception.

AccuWeather long-range tropical meteorologists, led by Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski, are projecting two to four more tropical storms, of which one or two may become hurricanes, following Tropical Storm Joyce.

There have been 10 tropical storms, of which five became hurricanes. Three named systems, Alberto, Florence and Gordon, made landfall in the United States.

Thus far, Florence has been the only major hurricane (Category 3 or higher) in the basin.

https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/there-is-still-more-of-hurricane-season-to-go-expert-warns-another-tropical-threat-may-make-us-landfall/70006119

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Hurricane Florence Aftermath

9/19/2018 (Permalink)

Florence aftermath is a 'nightmare' of swollen rivers, flooding and rising deaths

(CNN)Hurricane Florence's rainfall has stopped, but its "nightmare" destruction isn't over yet.

On Wednesday, thousands of evacuees were urged to stay away from their homes, rivers kept rising, and the threat of floods remained high in North and South Carolina. Many roads remained closed,and thousands of people lack power.President Donald Trump spoke with state and federal officials about 11 a.m. ET at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point on the Neuse River in North Carolina. Trump said the federal government would do everything necessary to ensure recovery. He praised first responders and said the country mourns with the families of the at least 36 people killed by Florence."Our state took a gut punch and our state is still reeling," North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper told Trump, calling the storm "epic, disastrous and widespread."  "We've got a long road ahead in the days, in the months and even years ahead to make sure we build back." https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/19/us/florence-wednesday-wxc/index.html SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365, for all of your restoration need!

UPDATE on Hurricane Florence

9/11/2018 (Permalink)

Expanding in size, violent Hurricane Florence is continuing on a beeline toward the East Coast as an “extremely dangerous” Category 4 hurricane. Catastrophic flooding and destructive winds are becoming very likely in the eastern Carolinas.

Forecasts generally project the storm to make landfall between northern South Carolina and North Carolina’s Outer Banks as a strong Category 3  on Thursday, although shifts in the track are possible and storm impacts will expand great distances beyond where landfall occurs.

The National Hurricane Center is warning of a triple threat in the Carolinas and Virginia:

  1. A “life-threatening storm surge” at the coast — a rise in ocean water over normally dry land.
  2. “Life-threatening freshwater flooding from a prolonged and exceptionally heavy rainfall event” from the coast to interior sections.
  3. “Damaging hurricane-force winds” at the coast and some distance inland.

Like Hurricane Harvey, which stalled over Texas in 2017, Florence could linger over the Southeast for several days after landfall, unloading 15 to 20 inches of rain and isolated amounts to 30 inches. The Hurricane Center said this “could produce catastrophic flash flooding.”

The flooding might be similar to or worse than what the Carolinas experienced during Hurricane Matthew in 2016.

More than 1.5 million people have been ordered to evacuate coastal areas ahead of the storm, due to both destructive winds and storm surge which could place normally dry land under at least 10 feet of water.

“All interests from South Carolina into the Mid-Atlantic region should ensure they have their hurricane plan in place and follow any advice given by local officials,” the Hurricane Center said.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2018/09/11/hurricane-florence-watches-posted-as-extremely-dangerous-florence-churns-toward-carolinas/?utm_term=.ecf5ee1a8b4f

 

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Hurricane Florence headed to Carolina

9/10/2018 (Permalink)

Approximately 800 South Carolina National Guard soldiers and airmen have been mobilized to prepare, respond and participate in recovery efforts associated with Hurricane Florence, according to a statement from the 169th Fighter Wing Public Affairs Office.

The guard personnel are deploying from McEntire Joint National Guard Base near Columbia and heading to Bluffton, South Carolina, for assignment, according to the statement.

 

What we're covering here

  • Hurricane Florence has its sights set on the Carolinas, and if it hits as hard as predicted, the storm will be the most powerful to pound the area in three decades.
  • ETA: The storm is expected to approach the Southeastern US coast on Thursday as a Category 4 storm or higher. Track it here.

https://www.cnn.com/us/live-news/hurricane-florence-dle/index.html

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Hurricane Florence

9/7/2018 (Permalink)

MIAMI —

After intensifying into a major hurricane, Florence substantially weakened and was reclassified as a tropical storm Friday morning with sustained winds of 65 miles per hour.

"Florence's structure continues to be negatively affected by strong southwesterly shear," the National Hurricane Center wrote in a 5 a.m. update. 

>>>Checklist: Be prepared for a hurricane

However, in the next 48 hours, the storm is expected to restrengthen.

On Wednesday, Florence became the first major hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic season, with maximum sustained winds peaking at 130 mph, making it a Category 4 hurricane, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Florence is expected regain major hurricane intensity (Category 3 or greater) by early next week -- as the storm moves northwest, getting closer to the US coastline by the day.

It's too early to tell if the storm will make landfall somewhere on the East Coast, or if it will turn harmlessly back to sea.

Still, there are some troubling signs in the major computer models that meteorologists use to predict hurricane tracks a week or more in advance.

The European and American models have shifted westward in the past two days, consistently showing a menacing hurricane coming dangerously close to the Eastern Seaboard.

There are dozens of different models and versions of forecast tracks that meteorologists have among their forecasting tools, and a majority still show the center of Florence staying offshore -- but most track it close enough to cause some impact next week.

Florence should track south of Bermuda early next week but will be close enough to bring gusty winds and dangerous surf conditions. Large swells will also begin affecting the Southeastern US coastlines, with larger waves and rough surf as early as this weekend, increasing through next week.

Florence's track will depend on the development and movement of a number of weather systems as the storm gets steered by a large ridge of high pressure in the Eastern United States and northern Atlantic as well as the progress of a low pressure trough across the country.

But East Coast residents can feel reassured about one thing: More than 75 storms have passed within 200 miles of Florence's current location in the Atlantic since hurricane records began in the 1850s, and not a single one made a US landfall.

Even if Florence stays out to sea, models show other systems developing over the Atlantic, almost on cue as the hurricane season hits its peak Monday. The eight weeks around then often are prime time for the conditions that fuel powerful storms.

The National Hurricane Center is monitoring a couple of other tropical waves in the eastern Atlantic that it says are likely to develop into tropical storms in the next several days.

https://www.wesh.com/article/tropical-storm-florence-expected-to-restrengthen/22976790

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Tropical Storm Gordon

9/4/2018 (Permalink)

Tropical Storm Gordon threatens Gulf Coast, hurricane warning in place

Tropical Storm Gordon continued to gain strength Tuesday morning and is expected to become a hurricane by the time it hits the central U.S. Gulf Coast, including coastal Mississippi -- just as the hurricane season reaches its peak period.

Voluntary evacuation orders were issued Monday for parts of Louisiana for residents in areas outside the levee protection system. Gov. John Bel Edwards declared a state of emergency Monday and said 200 National Guard troops will be deployed to southeastern Louisiana.

The National Hurricane Center said at 11 a.m. ET that the storm was centered 145 miles east-southeast of the Mississippi River. Maximum sustained winds were clocked at 65 mph. After making landfall, it is expected to charge inland over the lower Mississippi Valley on Wednesday.

"Tropical Storm Gordon is forecast to intensify to a minimal hurricane before making landfall near Mississippi tonight before midnight," Fox News Senior Meteorologist Janice Dean said Tuesday. "Luckily the storm will be a quick mover lessening impacts from being a prolonged event."

The hurricane warning was placed into effect for the area stretching from the mouth of the Pearl River in Mississippi to the Alabama-Florida border. As much as 8 inches of rain could fall in some parts of the Gulf states through late Thursday.

"Heavy rain will accompany Gordon along its track, spreading an extensive swath of 3 to 6 inches will locally higher amounts," Dean said. "Severe thunderstorms will also be likely over parts of the Gulf Coast with damaging winds and isolated tornadoes."

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/09/04/tropical-storm-gordon-threatens-gulf-coast-hurricane-warning-in-place.html

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HURRICANE SEASON IS COMING TO LIFE

8/29/2018 (Permalink)

Weather models have flipped the switch': Hurricane season coming to life in the Atlantic

The sleeping giant may be about to awaken.

Hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico is forecast to ramp up over the next couple of weeks. "Weather models have flipped the switch on the Atlantic hurricane season and see multiple areas of development possible starting mainly this weekend," weather.us meteorologist Ryan Maue said.  

One storm could spin up in the Caribbean over the next couple of days and potentially affect Florida over the Labor Day weekend. Looking further ahead, "there is the potential for two or three tropical features spinning over the Atlantic by the second weekend in September," AccuWeather meteorologist Dan Kottlowski said.

The next tropical storm or hurricane in the Atlantic basin will be called Florence.

One of the reasons for the predicted uptick in activity is that wind shear, which tends to rip apart developing hurricanes, appears to be decreasing. "There are signs now that wind shear may drop over a significant part of the Atlantic basin over the next couple of weeks," according to AccuWeather meteorologist Bernie Rayno.

However, it's still too early to predict exactly where or when any storm might form or whether a storm will affect land areas.  

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/08/29/hurricane-season-coming-life-atlantic/1132669002/

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Hurricane Lane has a successor

8/27/2018 (Permalink)

TROPICAL STORM MIRIAM PATH: HAWAII'S HURRICANE LANE HAS A SUCCESSOR

Thankfully, Miriam is not likely to come near Hawaii. Although its current path is expected to track west until Wednesday, Miriam will then begin heading north. At its closest, it should be around 600 miles east of Hawaii.

Tropical storms are upgraded to hurricanes once they exceed wind speeds of 74 miles per hour. Miriam is traveling at a speed of around 14 mph. At the time of this writing, there were no warnings in place for the tropical storm.

Just days after Hawaii appeared to avoid the worst from Hurricane Lane, a new tropical storm has formed in the Pacific.

Tropical Storm Miriam has formed about 2,000 miles east of Hawaii, with maximum wind speeds of around 60 miles per hour. According to the National Hurricane Center (NRC), Miriam is strengthening and is expected to turn into a hurricane on Monday night.

“Miriam's cloud pattern and overall convective organization have continued to improve, with a tight comma-cloud pattern now evident in infrared imagery,” the NRC said in a report. “Steady strengthening still appears likely for the next couple of days.”

Thankfully, Miriam is not likely to come near Hawaii. Although its current path is expected to track west until Wednesday, Miriam will then begin heading north. At its closest, it should be around 600 miles east of Hawaii.

Tropical storms are upgraded to hurricanes once they exceed wind speeds of 74 miles per hour. Miriam is traveling at a speed of around 14 mph. At the time of this writing, there were no warnings in place for the tropical storm.

https://www.newsweek.com/tropical-storm-miriam-path-hawaiis-hurricane-lane-has-successor-1091196

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Hurricane Lane brings over 31 inches of rain to the Big Island

8/24/2018 (Permalink)

Hurricane Lane churns toward Hawaii, Big Island has already seen over 31 inches of rain

As Hurricane Lane lurches north, the Category 3 storm has already dumped more than 31 inches of rain on Hawaii's Big Island, bringing catastrophic flooding.

The life-threatening flooding could even lead to landslides or mudslides.

Rainfall rates in the outer bands of the hurricane may reach 1 to 3 inches per hour, meaning flash flood watches will remain in effect through late Friday.

Lane is expected to remain a hurricane for the next 12 to 24 hours but increasing wind shear could weaken the storm more quickly over the next two to three days.

The storm is forecast to pull away from Hawaii by late Saturday.

https://abcnews.go.com/US/extreme-flooding-reported-hurricane-lane-nears-hawaii/story?id=57374083

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365, for all of your restoration needs!

Hurricane Lane

8/21/2018 (Permalink)

Hurricane Lane, a major hurricane, could turn toward Hawaii this week

Another hurricane is threatening to impact Hawaii this week, as dangerous Category 3 Hurricane Lane approaches the Central Pacific island chain just two weeks after Hurricane Hector passed the islands.

Lane has maximum winds of 125 mph (201 km/h) and is located about 600 miles (965 km) southeast of Hawaii's big island.The storm is currently moving westward at 14 mph (22 km/h) and should continue to move west over the next day or so. But forecast models are indicating that Lane will turn in a more northerly direction by late Tuesday and Wednesday, which could put it on track to bring significant impacts to the islands.There has been a significant jump to the north in the forecast models over the past 24 hours, bringing the Hawaiian Islands squarely into the five-day forecast cone issued by the Central Pacific Hurricane Center in Honolulu.  Track the storm hereThe National Weather Service in Hawaii has already issued a Tropical Storm Watch for the southern and western portions of the Big Island's coastline."Strong winds associated with Hurricane Lane may impact waters south of the Big Island as early as Wednesday morning, with rough seas and swells expected to increase Tuesday night," according to the NWS.https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/20/us/hawaii-hurricane-lane-wxc/index.html SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365 for all of your restoration needs

4 things seen in the tropics this past week

8/13/2018 (Permalink)

4 Interesting Things We Saw in the Tropics in the Past Week

At a Glance

  1. Hector was a major hurricane in the northeastern Pacific longer than any other hurricane on record in that basin.
  2. Tropical Storm Debby became the fourth named storm of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season.
  3. Four named tropical cyclones were active at once in the eastern half of the Pacific Ocean.
  4. Typhoon Shanshan scraped parts of mainland Japan.

Several interesting things caught our eye in the tropics in the past week, including Hurricane Hector's length of time as major hurricane in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm Debby's formation in the Atlantic Ocean, an active eastern half of the Pacific Ocean and Typhoon Shanshan's scrape with Japan.

https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2018-08-11-interesting-things-we-saw-in-the-tropics-early-august

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7 Predicted Hurricanes

8/10/2018 (Permalink)

Atlantic Could Spawn Up to 7 Hurricanes in the 2018 Storm Season

With four storms already in the books, the Atlantic is expected to produce a total of nine to 13 named storms during the six-month hurricane season that ends Nov. 30, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said.

That’s down from the 10 to 16 systems of tropical-storm strength or greater the agency that oversees the National Weather Service called for in May. Of the total announced Thursday, four to seven could become hurricanes, with only one, or perhaps even none, becoming a major system with winds of 111 miles per hour or more. A storm is named when winds reach at least 39 mph.

“All of these numbers are lower than we predicted in May,” Gerry Bell, hurricane forecaster with the U.S. Climate Prediction Center.

http://fortune.com/2018/08/09/atlantic-hurricane-season-2018/

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Subtropical Storm Debby

8/7/2018 (Permalink)

As the 2018 hurricane season enters its busiest months, conditions remain very active in the Pacific.

In the Atlantic, a low-pressure system that had a 20 percent chance for development Monday grew into Subtropical Storm Debby Tuesday morning.

Hurricane season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

Subtropical Storm Debby formed in the North Atlantic late Tuesday.

  • Location: 1,160 miles west of the Azores
  • Maximum sustained winds: 40 mph
  • Movement: north at 16 mph

At 11 a.m., the  center of Subtropical Storm Debby was located near 1,160 miles west of the Azores. 

https://www.tcpalm.com/story/weather/hurricanes/2018/08/07/hurricanes-hector-john-churn-pacific-atlantic-system-has-50-chance-development/921480002/

SERVPRO of North Arlington is here 24/7 365, so call us today at 817-557-1447. SERVPRO of North Arlington is waiting to serve you with all of your restoration needs.

Fewer storms predicted

7/30/2018 (Permalink)

Atlantic hurricane season forecast changes for the better with fewer storms predicted

Some good news from top hurricane forecasters: The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season should be quieter than normal, according to a new predictionreleased Monday.

Meteorologist Phil Klotzbach and other experts from Colorado State University – regarded as the nation's top seasonal hurricane forecasters – predict 10 named tropical storms will form, of which four will become hurricanes.

That is a sharp decrease from their forecast in April, when they said 7 hurricanes would form. One system, Subtropical Storm Alberto, already formed in May.If the quiet forecast comes to fruition, 2018 will be a welcome relief after the destructive 2017 season, which saw monsters like Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria tear paths of death and destruction across the Caribbean and the U.S.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/07/03/hurricane-season-2018-forecast/755215002/

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Hurricane season in full force

7/23/2018 (Permalink)

2018 Atlantic hurricane season.

 
The 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 to November 30. The areas covered include the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.The National Weather Service defines a hurricane as a "tropical cyclone with maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher."  Hurricanes are rated according to intensity on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. The 1-5 scale estimates potential property damage.A Category 3 or higher is considered a major hurricane.The National Hurricane Center advises preparedness:hurricane watch indicates the possibility that a region could experience hurricane conditions within 48 hours.A hurricane warning indicates that sustained winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 36 hours. https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/10/us/2018-atlantic-hurricane-season-fast-facts/index.html

 Contact SERVPRO of North Arlington for all of your restoration needs, our North Arlington office is ready to serve you 817-557-1447. With over 1,700 Franchises nationwide, SERVPRO is a leader in the restoration industry and its professionals are faster to any size disaster. SERVPRO Franchise Professionals are available 24 hours/7 days a week and are ready to restore or clean your property.   

Storm Tips and Tricks

5/1/2018 (Permalink)

Count the number of seconds between seeing lightning and hearing thunder to get an idea of how far away a storm is and how long you still have before

Storm Tips and Tricks 

Storms or strong winds can cause a lot of bother and damage, so it pays to be prepared. Count the number of seconds between seeing lightning and hearing thunder to get an idea of how far away a storm is and how long you still have before it arrives. Every three seconds is roughly equivalent to one kilometre.

  • Take patio furniture, bins, gardening tools and ornaments inside or secure them
  • Close sunshades and put away parasols
  • If you’re in the woods, seek shelter in a group of low trees and never stand under a tree standing on its own
  • You are best protected in a car
  • Don’t stand in front of an open window
  • Unplug all electrical devices to prevent them being destroyed if lightning strikes
  • Disconnect radio and TV cables
  • Put your car in your garage or under your carport

Prevent hail damage

  • Park your car in a garage or under a roof
  • If you have to park your car outside, then protect it with a thick blanket
  • Protect skylights with a thick blanket or old carpet
  • Leave your pool cover open instead of closing it

Driving in a storm or hail storm

  • Look for a safe, covered place and wait for the storm to pass
  • If you cannot find shelter, then stop in a safe place and wait for the storm or hail storm to pass. This reduces the impact and damage

Thank You To All Of Our Wonderful Administrators!

4/25/2018 (Permalink)

You are an invaluable member of our team! Thank you for all that you do!

Happy National Administrative Professionals' Day!

In honor of National Administrative Professionals' Day. We would like to thank our wonderful office staff. Thank you for your amazing customer service and hard work without you none of this would be possible! Behind every successful team there is an efficient administrative professional! Today is the perfect day to thank you for all of your help and hard work!  

We appreciate all of your patience and dedication for taking care of Arlington residents in their time of need! Your service is greatly appreciated and a blessing to us all!

You are an invaluable member of our team!

Thank you for all that you do!

A Flood of Emotions

4/4/2018 (Permalink)

When damage strikes our local SERVPRO technicians are ready to respond 24/7!

SERVPRO of North Arlington knows that with every flood comes a flood of emotion. When your home, business or belongings become damaged, you don’t just want things clean, you want your life back!

And that’s where SERVPRO comes in. SERVPRO of North Arlington specialize in flooding and storm damage restoration. Our number one goal is returning damaged areas and items to preloss condition, doing all that we can to help you regain control following a disaster. Our goal is to make it like it never even happened.

SERVPRO of North Arlington has local storm and water damage specialists who get started promptly to get your property dry and back to pre-storm condition. Using advanced equipment and scientific drying techniques, we document the drying process to validate whether your home or business is ready. In addition to our own resources, we have access to equipment and personnel from over 1,700 Franchises across the state and country. We can even call upon our local strategically located Disaster Recovery Teams such as http://www.SERVPROnortharlingtontx.com/water-damage-restoration for catastrophic storms and major events.

Need Emergency Service? Call Us 24/7 – (817)557-1447

How Prepared Is your Family for an Emergency?

4/4/2018 (Permalink)

Does Your Family Have an Emergency Plan?

When Disaster Strikes!

Is your family prepared for an emergency?

Disasters can strike at anytime and when they do time is extremely important. At SERVPRO of North Arlington we understand that these situations can be unavoidable. This is why here at SERVPRO of North Arlington we have provided tips for Arlington families to be prepared for emergency situations. 

  • Prepare an Emergency Kit- depending on the type of disaster injuries may be imminent. It is essential in the event of an emergency to have an emergency kit nearby. Have your kit made and in a safe location that is easy to access. Your kit must include items such as first aid kit, flashlights, and non-perishable food items. 
  • Arrange a "Safe Haven"- Plan your emergency exit and arrange a meeting place for your family in case of separation. Be sure that small children are aware of how to exit and where to meet in the event of an emergency. 
  • Keep Extra Supplies on Hand- If you need to escape your home for any reason and you plan to use your vehicle. In an emergency you may not be the only family that needs to evacuate the area. Have your escape route out of the city mapped out. Keep maps in your vehicle with your emergency kit and extra supplies such as gas, jumper cables,batteries, flares and more. 
  • Emergency Etiquette- In emergencies it is imperative that your family remains calm. Although, it may be hard to control your emotions in unpredictable situations it is essential that your family is mentally prepared for all survival situations. Prepare small children for what is to come next. Keeping your family informed may keep everyone calm enough to escape emergency. Go over " Emergency Etiquette",to prepare your family for any situation. 

If your North Arlington home is suffering from Storm, Fire or Water Damage call your local SERVPRO of North Arlington at (817)557-1447

The best way to keep safe during a hurricane is to be prepared

12/15/2017 (Permalink)

While there are a number of other dangerous weather situations that can pop up two of the most severe are hurricanes and tropical storms. These are storms that can cause property damage, flooding and if people are not prepared could cause a loss of life.

Both hurricanes and tropical storms originate in tropical areas and are differentiated by severity. Both have heavy winds and rain. However, hurricanes are generally stronger storms with more rain and stronger wind. Regardless of the severity, they both are dangerous and people need to prepare in the event of being in the path of a strong storm.

In the event of hearing that a hurricane or tropical storm is coming to your area, there are a few things to be prepared in order to remain safe. If you find yourself in the path of a major storm the first thing is to make sure you get inside a secure building. Also, securing any doors and windows in advance of the storm may prevent any injury.

BEFORE A HURRICANE:

  • Have a disaster plan ready. List SERVPRO Grand Prairie as a contact to assist after the storm has hit, 972-602-1112
  • Have a pet plan. Before a storm threatens, contact your veterinarian or local humane society for information on preparing your pets for an emergency.
  • Board up windows.
  • Bring in outdoor objects that could blow away.
  • Make sure you know which county or parish you live in.
  • Know where all the evacuation routes are.
  • Prepare a disaster supplies kit for your home and car. Have enough food and water for at least 3 days. Include a first aid kit, canned food and a can opener, bottled water, battery-operated radio, flashlight, protective clothing and written instructions on how to turn off electricity, gas, and water.
  • Have a NOAA weather radio handy with plenty of batteries, so you can listen to storm advisories.
  • Have some cash handy. Following a hurricane, banks and ATMs may be temporarily closed.
  • Make sure your car is filled with gasoline.

DURING A HURRICANE:

  • Stay away from low-lying and flood prone areas.
  • Always stay indoors during a hurricane, because strong winds will blow things around.
  • Leave mobile homes and to go to a shelter.
  • If your home isn’t on higher ground, go to a shelter.
  • If emergency managers say to evacuate, then do so immediately.

AFTER A HURRICANE:

  • Stay indoors until it is safe to come out.
  • Check for injured or trapped people, without putting yourself in danger.
  • Watch out for flooding which can happen after a hurricane.
  • Do not attempt to drive in flooding water.
  • Stay away from standing water. It may be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.

Don’t drink tap water until officials say it’s safe to do so.

Freezing temperature

12/6/2017 (Permalink)

With the sudden change in temperature meteorologists are predicting that we could be experiencing freezing temperatures soon. With this in mind it is wise to be proactive to keep your pipes from freezing and then bursting.

To prevent water pipes from freezing in cold weather:

  1. Open cabinet doors under sinks located on outside walls.
  2. Leave hot and cold water dripping in faucets.
  3. Put foam covers over outdoor spigots.
  4. Insulate water pipes with foam pipe insulation.

In the case that we do encounter freezing temperatures and you faced with a broken pipe please feel free to contact us to help. SERVPRO of North Arlington will be more than happy to assist you in minimizing the damages to your home or business.

SERVPRO North Arlington: 817-557-1447.

Tropical Cindy is on it's way!

6/21/2017 (Permalink)

Are you ready for STORM?

With tropical storms and hurricanes starting to show face it is very important that we are prepared and educated on how to keep safe. Though we will not be affected here locally in the DFW area it is still very important that we are informed what is happening in every storm situation.

First and foremost keeping yourself informed with the type of storm that is being projected is very important. So let’s see what they are saying about Tropical Storm Cindy.

Tropical Storm Cindy continues to track through the northwest Gulf of Mexico, bringing potentially life-threatening flooding concerns to parts of the Gulf Coast and South through late this week. Gusty winds, rip currents and isolated tornadoes are also expected. Moisture and energy from Cindy will also spread north and east ahead of a cold front Thursday-Friday, which will result in heavy rain and possible flooding from the South to as far north as the Ohio Valley. A tropical storm warning has been issued from San Luis Pass, Texas, to the mouth of the Mississippi River, which means tropical storm conditions are expected within 36 hours. This warning area includes Houston, Galveston, Texas, Lake Charles, Louisiana, and Lafayette, Louisiana.

Tropical storm conditions are ongoing in the warning area and will spread westward within the warning area through early Thursday. Cindy is expected to move northwestward and approach the coasts of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas late Wednesday into Wednesday night, before moving inland near the Texas/Louisiana border Thursday.

SERVPRO of North Arlington is prepared to assist in this storm situation! Stay safe.

817-557-1447

Tornado Alley... We are in Peak Season! Let us HELP you!

4/24/2017 (Permalink)

Did you know that Texas is known for having the most tornadoes in all the 50 states.


Or how about that Tarrant county has had the most tornadoes than any other county in the US since 2000.


The peak of tornado season for North Central Texas occurs in late-April to early May. Dallas-Ft. Worth is the largest metropolitan area in Tornado Alley.

The highest average annual concentration of violent-class (F4-F5) tornadoes occurs between Dallas-Ft. Worth and Oklahoma City.


Let's break down the cause of a tornado.


The relatively flat land in the Great Plains allows cold dry polar air from Canada to meet warm moist tropical air from the Gulf of Mexico. A large number of tornadoes form when these two air masses meet, along a phenomenon known as a "dryline." The dryline is a boundary separating hot, dry air to the west from warm, moist air to the east. You can see it on a weather map by looking for sharp changes in dew point temperatures. Between adjacent weather stations the differences in dew point can vary by as much as 40 degrees or more. The dryline is usually found along the western high plains. Air moving down the eastern slopes of the Rockies warms and dries as it sinks onto the plains, creating a hot, dry, cloud-free zone. During the day, it moves eastward mixing up the warm moist air ahead of it. If there is enough moisture and instability in the warm air, severe storms can form - because the dryline is the "push" the air needs to start moving up! During the evening, the dryline "retreats" and drifts back to the west. The next day the cycle can start all over again, until a larger weather system pushes through and washes it away. Tornadoes kill an average of 60 people per year, mostly from flying or falling debris.


I know that nothing can prepare for the devastation that is left as a result from tornadoes but you can be prepared by having our contact information in the case that you need someone to assist you in your time of disaster.


We are here to help in anyway needed. From removing debris, to assisting in packing out your home, inventory non-salvageable items, we are here to help along the way.


SERVPRO North Arlington, South Arlington, and Grand Prairie


972-602-1112 / 817-557-1447 / 817-557-1505